Each of the issues depicted in the popular Netflix series 13 Reasons Why are real problems that teens in our community are facing. Based on the show, each month from September 2018–September 2019, Jewish Federation & Family Services will be addressing a different reason why you or your loved one might need support.

Our therapists are trained to address the core issues behind problems like loneliness, isolation and bullying, as well as mental health diagnoses like depression and anxiety.  If you or someone you love is experiencing any of the 13 Reasons, please call us today!  Phone number: 949.435.3460

 



September (Suicide Awareness Month): There’s no single cause for suicide. Suicide most often occurs when stressors and health issues converge to create an experience of hopelessness and despair. Depression is the most common condition associated with suicide, and it is often undiagnosed or untreated. Conditions like depression, anxiety and substance problems, especially when unaddressed, increase risk for suicide.

Resources

  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
    Call 1-800-273-8255

  • The Didi Hirsch Suicide prevention center. Click here

  • American foundation on Suicide prevention.  Click here


October (Bullying Prevention Month):Bullying affects all youth, including those who are bullied, those who bully others, and those who see bullying occur. Some effects may last into adulthood. The most common types of bullying are verbal and social. Most bullying takes place in school, outside on school grounds, and on the school bus. Bullying also happens wherever kids gather in the community. And of course, cyberbullying occurs on cell phones and online.
 

Resources

November (Rumors/Reputation): You are not born with a reputation. Instead, you develop your reputation over time through your behavior and relationships with others. If you spread rumors about others or behave badly, you can develop a bad reputation. You may also develop a bad reputation if people spread rumors or negative statements about you, even if your behavior isn't actually bad. Repairing a bad reputation takes time, honesty, and effort.

Resources

December (Loneliness/Isolation): Teen culture is social by nature; young people tend to move around in groups. So a teen who is isolated—by chance or choice—is at a distinct disadvantage and is often treated as an outcast. The effects of isolation on a teenager can be long lasting.

Resources

January (Anxiety): Anxiety is a normal part of childhood, and every child goes through phases. A phase is temporary and usually harmless. But children who suffer from an anxiety disorder experience fear, nervousness, and shyness, and they start to avoid places and activities. Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children. Research shows that untreated children with anxiety disorders are at higher risk to perform poorly in school, miss out on important social experiences, and engage in substance abuse
 

Resources

 

  • The calm Clinic site offers information about anxiety and free tests teens can take to assess their anxiety or depression levels. Click here

  • Free apps to Download: Calm, Stop Breathe Think, Virtual Hope Box

February (Sexual Assault/Rape): Approximately 1.8 million adolescents in the United States have been the victims of sexual assault throughout their lifetimes.  Sexual assaults may or may not involve force and include such things as grabbing or fondling. Sexual assault also includes verbal threats.

Resources

March (Self-Harm): 1/3 to 1/2 of U.S. adolescents have engaged in some type of self-injury; cutting and burning are the most common types of non-suicidal self-injury. 55% of self-injurers said, “I wanted to get my mind off my problems.”45% said, “It helped me to release tension or stress and relax.”

Resources

  • Crisis counseling text line:  741741

  • Self Harming Behaviors. Click here

  • Statistics and resources about teen self-harm. Click here

April (Drinking/Drug Use): Teen substance abuse is a widespread problem that has far-reaching effects, considering that 9 out 10 adult addicts began using before they turned 18. Many teens use substances for reasons other than just having fun–it can be a sign of a deeper issue like depression, anxiety, or trauma.

Resources

 

May (Depression): Depression is more than just feeling sad all of the time–it is a disorder that can affect your ability to sleep, eat, or take care of everyday life. Depression can happen to anyone at any age—even those who appear to have it all together.

Resources

 

  • Parents’ guide to teen depression. Click here  

June (LGBTQ Stigma/Pride Month): LGBTQ individuals are almost three times more likely than others to experience a mental health condition such as major depression or generalized anxiety disorder. Pride month began as a response to the hatred and discrimination that the LGBTQ community faced–and still faces 50 years later.

 

Resources

 

July (Disappointment): Teens don’t always live up to the expectations of their families, friends, or even of themselves. Feeling disappointed in oneself or others is a normal part of life, and without proper coping skills it can negatively affect self-esteem or relationships.  This is particularly obvious on social media such as Facebook and Instagram.

Resources

August (Miscommunication):  Communication is something that we do every single day. We can communicate both verbally and non-verbally.  Over text messages and social media, a common form of communication amongst teens, communication becomes even more complicated and easy to create miscommunication.

Resources

September (Violence): There are several theories as to why teens act out in violence. Some of the more common reasons for acting out involve modeling behaviors. Violence can be a result of many life circumstances—such as bullying, drug abuse, mental illness, and more.

Resources